The Trouble With Concession Stands In Youth Sports

Continue having conversations with your kids and educating them on healthy habits. Instead of looking at the calories burned while they play sports, think about the long term effects unhealthy foods can have on them. Think about the message you … Continue reading

Giving without Receiving

  Over the  years I have tried to instill in my children the lesson that giving does not always mean receiving in return. Perhaps in the past they were too young, or there wasn’t a strong enough reason or passion … Continue reading

Perfection Doesn’t Exist

  This title has a lot of different meanings, but what I am referring to here specifically is overall health. I have driven myself nuts in the last year to ensure everything my family eats and does is healthy. I … Continue reading

Inside Out (The Effects of Exercise Inside the Body)

I joined the local gym last August in an attempt to combat my anxiety and in general, my mental health, as well as to keep physically fit. I knew if I paid the money up front for one year, I would hold myself accountable to going most days of the week. I notice when I skip a day or two I am short tempered and irritable. Anyhow, in the eight months since I have been going to the gym these are some of the “motivators” I hear during class:

“It’s almost summer. Let’s get bikini ready.”

“It’s almost tank top season. Let’s pump up those arms.”

“It’s almost shorts season. Let’s work on those legs.”

“We work out so we can eat that cake/drink that wine.”

“Let’s burn off those extra calories from the weekend.”

“Let’s burn off those calories we ate this week from Thanksgiving/Christmas/Passover.”

Why do people exercise? Work out? Participate in sports or any physical activity? Is it out of vanity? Is it to look good? Maybe. Is it so they can eat whatever/whenever they want? Maybe. Society/social media tends to  focus  on how we are supposed to LOOK, instead of on how we  should FEEL inside (emotionally and physically). This needs to change. Not every person is ever going to be a size 2, nor should they be. That is below the norm and for some people, that is not a healthy size.

Let’s face it. Some people that go to the gym, are never going to wear a bikini, tank top, or shorts. And if they choose to, and they are not what society deems a “beach body”, I applaud them for having great self confidence. It doesn’t matter what one looks like, but how one feels inside. Physically. Emotionally. Spiritually. I believe a lot of gym goers, like myself, are at the gym because they want to be healthy. They are not at the gym striving for a “beach body”. Well, I’m not, anyway. I go to release tension, keep my anxiety at bay, and stay heart healthy.

Physical activity promotes good health in many ways. In an earlier post I wrote about the effects of exercise on mental health. We can physically see what exercise does to the outside of the body (tones muscles/keeps figures slim), but do we really know what it does to the inside of our body? Here are twelve effects physical activity has on the inside of the body:

1. Boosts high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or “good,” cholesterol and decreases unhealthy triglycerides. This helps the blood flow smoothly and decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

2. Delivers oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and helps the cardiovascular system work more efficiently.

3. Boosts the immune system.

4. Significantly reduces the risk of developing high blood pressure and can help to lower blood pressure in those who already have high blood pressure.

5.Prevents and helps control type 2 diabetes. Exercise helps insulin to work better and also makes the cells more sensitive to the effects of insulin.

6. Aids in digestion and promotes regular bowel movements.

7. Helps to prevent the build-up of plaque on the walls of arteries decreasing the risk of heart disease.

8. Weight-bearing exercises help preserve bone mass and thus protects against osteoporosis.

9. Builds and strengthens muscles, which can protect the bones from injury, and support and protect joints affected by arthritis. Strong muscles also give stability and improve balance and coordination.

10. Lubricates the joints, and reduces joint pain and stiffness. It also helps people with arthritis by increasing flexibility and muscle strength.

11. Improves respiratory efficiency.

12. Improves quality of life. Decreases risk of strokes, cancers, diabetes, heart disease. Slows the aging process and allows us to live longer.

Some of my friends are exercise instructors. I hope they still will be after this post. I am just trying to point out another way social media influences all of us, especially women. We all have to love the body we have, even the parts we don’t like. Big calves. Big butt. Wide hips. Flat chest. Round tummy. We need to stop focusing on what we wished we looked like and accept the body we have. Forget about burning calories and toning our bodies so we’ll look good in a bikini, tank top, shorts. Focus on how physical activity will make us FEEL. How it will prolong our lives. I hope to live a long time. I’ve only been given one body to live in, and I am going to do all I can to take care of it INSIDE and OUT!

 

My Nutrition Revolution

I thought it might be interesting to explore my nutrition revolution. That is, how I became interested in nutrition and how I revolutionized my own health. I was never sick. Never overly overweight (an extra 10 pounds). But I have definitely become healthier in many ways that one can’t see by looking at me.

I grew up a kid of the late ’70’s eating some processed foods. Oreos. Frito-Lay snack packs. Ice cream. That sort of thing. Nothing out of the ordinary and nothing outrageous. My mother cooked a nice, homemade dinner most nights of the week. I took a piece of fruit in my lunch to school. But beyond that one piece of fruit and whatever vegetable was served at dinner, I didn’t think to eat anymore, nor was I informed I should.  I ran cross country and track in high school and would come home famished before dinner. My snack of choice was a few oreos, some chips, anything that was easily accessible that I could snarf down. Fruit? Never. Vegetables? Never. I just didn’t know. Nor was I educated in nutrition. I don’t think my parents were either for that matter.  Until my  late 20’s I thought of food as a way to fill my belly and keep the hunger pain away. I didn’t think of it as a way to fuel my body and keep me healthy.

Off to college in 1994. Dining hall. Eat anything you want and as much as you want. Actually I really didn’t overeat in college. That has never been an issue for me. But I seriously lacked fruits and vegetables, and consumed to0 much processed foods, grains (carbs), dairy, and sugar.  After college I headed to Colorado to be a snowboard instructor. Every day for lunch we had pizza. Every. Day. Seriously. I didn’t give it much thought nutritionally. I love pizza. However, by the end of the season I was quite sick of eating it and ate peanut butter and jelly sandwiches instead. Not much better. Had I known then, what I know now, I would have brought my lunch to work. At night I worked in a restaurant, so in the hour between jobs I came home, showered, and ate something quick and easy, such as Easy Mac. Remember that? I don’t even want to think about it. The thought of it now totally sickens me. While living in Colorado I did take a nutrition course at a local college, as I was interested in nutrition even then. However, looking back that class really taught me nothing except what calories were and how to calculate them. The old school way of looking at nutrition.

I moved to California in the fall of 200o after I suffered a neck injury from a car accident in CO. I wanted to be far from the snow capped mountains and snowboarding since I was sure I wouldn’t be able to snowboard the following winter due to my injury. I had a very difficult time finding work in San Diego. Restaurants wouldn’t hire me because apparently 2 years of restaurant experience wasn’t enough. And I had a college degree….in psychology, not waitressing/bartending…. but still, you’d think they’d take the fact I was college educated into consideration. I ended up working as a nanny for about 6 months. However, that barely paid the bills as it is expensive living in San Diego. I ate cheaply. I made the decision to pursue an entry level’s masters degree in athletic training, which was something I was interested in during college, but Saint Michael’s didn’t offer that degree.

So, after surviving the 6 months in San Diego I moved back east and waited for graduate school to begin in the fall of 2001. I learned how nutrition affected athletes. How eating certain foods fueled the body. I began looking at my plate differently. I added more fruits and vegetables to  my diet, and limited processed foods. I even lost some weight at this time without thinking much about it. I had my first child in 2005 and my second in 2007. I maintained my weight, but I still didn’t necessarily eat as healthy as I do now. What prompted more of a change?

After 8  years of living at our current boarding school, 7 women associated with the school (faculty/staff or spouses) were diagnosed with breast cancer, and 2 or 3 men were diagnosed with another type of cancer. Within the same time frame I knew women in town (not associated with our boarding school) that were also stricken with breast cancer and even members of my own extended family, one of whom was only 34 at the time she was diagnosed.  I began asking, “What the hell is wrong? Why are all these folks getting cancer?” That is when I began actively researching how nutrition affected disease. I began reading books and viewing food/disease/nutrition documentaries and from those I made the decision that many of today’s diseases can be prevented (maybe even cured) simply by eating certain foods and avoiding others.

While processed foods may be quick, cheap, and easy, they are laden with chemicals and preservatives. The body has a difficult time digesting/processing these foods and therefore, they become stuck in our body adding bulk and wrecking havoc on our system. Think about the difference between a homemade brownie vs. a packaged brownie. Even if you leave a homemade brownie in plastic wrap or tupperware on the counter, it will get moldy or stale in a few days. If you leave a packaged brownie on the counter it will last for years! What exactly goes into that brownie to preserve its “freshness”? Nothing I want to put in my body!

When buying foods I stick to minimally or non processed foods. We eat vegetarian within the household 99% of the time, and I try to limit dairy when I can. I try to make most of of my family’s  baked goods/desserts, rather than buying them. I can make cookies with just a few ingredients vs. buying a box of Oreos that contains around 20 ingredients, including titanium dioxide, a chemical used to whiten the cream in Oreo cookies, as well as numerous other uses in the manufacturing of paper, plastic, and paint. Seriously? Who wants to put titanium dioxide in their body?

I buy lots of fruits and vegetables. I try to buy organic when it’s available, but I think it’s more important to have a diet high in fruits and vegetables despite them being organic or not. With minimally processed foods and plant sourced foods, the body takes in what it needs nutritionally and eliminates the rest. Nothing gets “stuck” in the body and causes issues. My husband, kids, and I hardly ever get sick. Not once did one of us get the nasty stomach bug that was rampant in this boarding school or the public school my children attend. I can’t think of one cold any of us had this winter. Yes, both kids had flu shots this year, but neither my husband nor I got inoculated. I swear the reason for our good health is due to what we eat and what we limit. Even in the last month I have found that eating more “real food” and limiting grains, dairy, alcohol, sugar, and processed foods that I have had less stomachaches and headaches. Smoothies have been my friend in the last month, as I am not a huge fruit eater. Even my daughter has been asking for a smoothie at breakfast or after school. If I could convert my son to drinking smoothies I’d be ecstatic and I know he would feel better (have less stomachaches).

Speaking of children, we need to start educating them now about healthy choices, healthy lifestyles. Now is the time to explore healthier options with children even though they may prefer the processed junk like granola bars, chips, cookies, etc. It is easier to start healthy habits as a child, than as an adult. Rather it is harder to break unhealthy habits as an adult, than as a child. One of the ways I do this is at snack time. I ask them to choose a fruit or vegetable first. When they finish that I let them choose something else. Since we don’t keep much processed junk in the house the choices usually are graham crackers and milk, pretzels, or a strawberry cereal bar (minimally processed foods). Hopefully this will aid them later in life to make healthy choices and not be a struggling adult trying to figure out how to lead a healthy lifestyle.

What are the ways you teach your children about healthy living?

 

DISCLAIMER: My family and I do eat pizza, ice cream, meat, Oreos, Doritos, etc. Just not on a daily basis. Those are “treats” for us. I am amazed at folks who stick to their non-processed, non-dairy, non-gluten, non-meat, non-sugar, and so on “diets” and never stray. But I like to live a little, and enjoy life while maintaining my health. Everything in moderation. That is the key.

 

 

Soccer Snack Wars

I figured it was fitting to begin my blog on the first day of soccer season considering I titled the blog ‘Snack Wars’. This all has to do with the war I wage every sports season with parents and coaches about the snack epidemic. Snack epidemic, you say? Yes! When my oldest child started playing soccer in Kindergarten, 4 years ago now, the coach asked every parent to sign up to bring post games snacks. Since I felt that it would be cruel and unfair to not allow my child to participate in the snacks while the rest of her teammates did, I decided to wage the war by suggesting we bring healthy snacks and even provided the team with a list of healthy ideas. While this went over well for the most part, some parents still brought Doritos and Oreos to share with the team after playing a game. I was outraged! Really? Our kids just engaged in some healthy exercise, and now we are feeding them crap! What is the point? The number one reason I sign my children up for organized sports is to participate in an active lifestyle. I don’t then want to reward them with unhealthy foods. I don’t want food to be a reward, period! Personally, I have no idea why these young athletes need to have a snack after playing for one hour. Most players live within 10 minutes from the field and are probably heading home after the game. On top of it, there is a snack bar at the fields in which the organization wants families to support, so if a child needs to be fed after an hour, why not go spend money at the snack bar and therefore, support the sports organization? My kids know I rarely allow them to eat anything from the snack bar, and if I know we are going to be at the fields for 2 hours with back to back games I will provide them with a healthy snack from home. So here we are at the beginning of another season. This time I am assistant coach for one of my children’s teams and believe me, I will still be waging the snack wars!